Incloude

Incloude is an investment scam that promises to pay you guaranteed returns of 24% per day for no apparent reason. Find out how this scam works today in our review.

What Is Incloude?

Incloude, found online at Incloude.com, is an investment company that claims to offer highly profitable investment portfolios. The company will pay you 1.2% to 24% ROI per day, every day. You just need to send them a bunch of money, and they’ll magically turn it into more money.

The official website lists just a single investment portfolio called “Primary Trust”. That portfolio consists of 60% fiat currencies, 11% cryptocurrencies, 21% binary options, and 8% futures. The managers of Incloude actively trade all of these assets to deliver consistent, steady gains to investors.

The company claims to have been founded in 2012 by “a small group of people”. The company claims to be based in Canada, although it claims to maintain a mining farm in Dublin, Ireland. None of the addresses or claims appear to be legitimate.

The company is so good at trading and investing that it offers “guaranteed stable profit in the absence of risks and loss of funds invested.” In other words, there’s a 100% chance to gain a positive ROI on your investment and a 0% chance you’ll lose any money.

Ultimately, when somebody promises to pay you guaranteed profits for no apparent reason, it’s a sign you’re probably being scammed. With that in mind, let’s take a closer look at how Incloude works.

How Does Incloude Work?

Incloude offers a single investment fund. That investment fund consists of four types of actively traded assets, including:

The company trades all of these assets regularly. As mentioned above, the company claims it never loses money, but always makes money. Despite the highly volatile world of cryptocurrency trading, forex trading, and binary options trading, the company has somehow managed to consistently generate a profit.

There are plenty of obvious red flags telling us that Incloude is a scam. There’s the absurd “guaranteed profit” promises, for example. Another red flag is that Canadian regulators recently banned binary options trading – and yet Incloude claims to be a Canadian company engaged in active binary options trading with investors’ money.

Ultimately, the point of Incloude’s website is to funnel gullible investors into the fund listed above. The website also vaguely mentions “direct investment (DI)” opportunities and general asset management, although no further information is listed online.

Incloude “Investment Packages”

Incloude offers five investment packages, all of which appear to be scams. We can find no evidence online that the company has ever paid any investor anything – not to mention returns of 1.2% to 24% per day as advertised:

  • Direct Solution: Invest $10 to $100 and receive a 1.2% daily ROI for 15 days.
  • Direct Invest: Invest $101 to $2000, 1.5% daily ROI for 25 days
  • Direct Invest Pro: Invest $2,001 to $20,000 and receive 1.8% daily ROI for 30 days
  • Direct Income: Invest $20,001 to $100,000 and receive 2% daily ROI for 35 days
  • Primary Trust: Invest $20,000 to $50,000 and receive 11% to 24% per day, every day, for the rest of your life

Who’s Behind Incloude?

Incloude, like most online scams, refuses to disclose much information about itself online. The company claims to be led by “Director General” Darak Hughes. As far as we can tell, this is a fictitious name. The only Google Search results for Darak Hughes are for a fake corporation listing on CompaniesHouse.gov.uk, as well as other reviews for Incloude.

The Incloude website lists an address in Calgary, Alberta, Canada, while their corporation registration document lists an address in the UK.

Incloude claims to have been successfully investing customers’ money since 2012. However, the Incloude.com website was a fake payday loan scam website back in 2012, and the Incloude investment scam didn’t appear online until earlier in 2017.

There are even videos posted on the Incloude.com website where “Darak Hughes” appears. He looks like a young Eastern European man in a wig. He reads off a script in broken English in an effort to convince you that Incloude is a legitimate investment opportunity.

Ultimately, when a company isn’t upfront about who’s running the operation, yet asks for your investment, it’s a huge red flag you’re being scammed.

Incloude Conclusion

Ultimately, Incloude is one of the most obvious scams we’ve seen online in recent months. None of the company’s products or services appear to be legitimate in any way, shape, or form. The company claims to offer enormous profits with no risk of losing your investment. The company also appears to list fraudulent addresses, fraudulent names, and fraudulent company history.

For all of these reasons, you should absolutely avoid Incloude. If you already deposited money, you’re never getting that money back. If someone tells you the company is legitimate, it’s only because they want you to sign up through their Incloude affiliate link. Be smarter than that.

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