Token Data

Yet another way in which blockchain technology has been disrupting business-as-usual can be found in the capitalization of start-up ventures. Initial Coin Offerings, or ICOs, are a little bit like issuing equity certificates (i.e an IPO) but also a lot like crowd-funding. And the rate of new ICOs appears to be accelerating, with so many wide-eyed dreamers with a great idea streaking past the banks, Wall Street, and VC firms, and then leaping over Kickstarters and GoFundMes with their donations, to land directly at the feet of individual investors. For this reason, ICOs are also sometimes called “crowdsales”.

With ICO tokens representing new cryptocurrencies, distributed applications (dApps), protocols, even new blockchains, and still more ideas than these, it can be difficult to stay on top of all the newest developments. Enter the ICO-tracking site Token Data.

What Is Token Data?

Token Data, found at tokendata.io, was founded by a few people with backgrounds in more traditional banking and finance. They know how to analyze the ICO situation, and the situation, in their words, is “insanity”. So the website is their attempt to make sense of what has been happening in this new world of venture capital funding. They expect to meet the needs of readers with all levels of experience and interest in the ICO market, and to provide that content for free.

What Does Token Data Do?

The landing page gives you the core dataset of all token sales, including completed, active, failed, and planned ICOs. The information includes details such as the amount raised, the dates of the sale, and what kind of project the token sale will fund.

Additional pages focus on the financials, one for a chronological list of the sales so you know which ones are about to end, and another that aggregates news and chatter about the selected token. There are also links to the Token Data blog, their Telegram channel, and a user login where you can track your own token interests.

How To Use Token Data

The Token Sales page, which is the landing page, lists all ICOs in a tabular form. Each column header can be clicked on to sort the data by that column, both ascending and descending. Two items are actually hyperlinked, otherwise, all that is shown in the table is for display only. First, the token’s logo in the far-left column can be clicked to go directly to the ICO website where their publications can be reviewed in detail, as well as information about how to invest. Then there is a link icon in the far-right column that will take you directly to the token’s whitepaper document.

A couple of columns have additional data that is revealed in “tooltip” fashion as you roll over the column. Hover over the Name and you will get some pop-up text that describes the purpose of the project, e.g. gambling dApp, or a new blockchain protocol. Hover over the Month and the precise start and end dates for the sale will appear.

The Advanced Returns page repeats some of the necessary data from the Token Sales page, like the icon and name, and the hyperlinks and pop-up text are preserved here, too. Additionally, hovering over the USD Raised column will reveal the number of tokens sold. Otherwise, the table is filled with prices and return rates, including in ETH and BTC, as well as ratios with the token itself. This page, and the Token Sales page, has a Search box to make quick work of finding a specific ICO.

The ICO Calendar page offers two lists: in the left list you will find active sales showing how many days remain in the sale, with ascending sorting so that the first items are the sales that have just ended or are about to end; the right list shows the upcoming sales and how many days before the start of the sale, also with ascending sorting so that the first items are the sales that are just about to begin.

On the Analytics page, you will find a drop-down selector to choose a particular ICO. Depending upon the ICO, below the selector will be several newsfeeds about the token. For example, tweets, Slack or Telegram conversations, Reddit posts, or articles from BitcoinTalk. Checkboxes can turn off individual feeds if you wish to focus on just a few areas, or if there are quite a few and the columns become narrow and hard to read.

Don’t forget to click on the Site Menu in the top-left corner. The links for these pages discussed above will be shown, but the menu also has the links to Token Data’s Telegram channel and their blog page. Although there is a large “My Tokens” button in the site header, you can find a link to the feature in the site menu as well.

TOP GUIDE ON HOW TO BUY BITCOIN TODAY

Enter Your Email To Receive Weekly Cryptocurrency Coin Reviews, News & Investing Insights

I will never give away, trade or sell your email address. You can unsubscribe at any time.

LEAVE A REPLY

Please enter your comment!
Please enter your name here